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Seabiscuit 2003 123movies

Seabiscuit 2003 123movies

The hopes of a nation rode on a long shot.141 Min.
Your rating: 0
8 1 vote

Summary:

#123movies #fmovies #putlocker #gomovies #solarmovie #soap2day Watch Full Movie Online Free – It’s the Depression, and everyone needs to hold onto a dream to get them through the bad times. Car maker Charles Howard is no different, he who is trying to rebuild his life after the tragic death of his only child and the resulting end of his first marriage. With second wife Marcela at his side, Charles wants to get into horse racing and ends up with a team of underdogs who are also chasing their own dream. The first is trainer Tom Smith, who has a natural instinct to spot the capabilities of horses. The second is the horse Tom chooses for Charles, Seabiscuit, an unconventional choice as despite his pedigreed lineage, Seabiscuit is small at fifteen and a half hands tall with a slight limp. But Tom can see something in Seabiscuit’s nature to make him a winner, if only Seabiscuit can be retrained from his inbred losing ways. And third is the jockey they decide to hire, Johnny “Red” Pollard, so nicknamed because of his hair color. Like Tom, Red has always shown a natural way with horses, but a difficult upbringing due solely to the Depression has made Red an angry young man, which has gotten him into trouble both on and off the track. And he is large for a jockey, and thus he always feels the need to battle the weight issue. Another common trait between Tom, Seabiscuit and Red is that they have been called crazy by those in traditional horse racing circles. Against the odds, Seabiscuit, with his human team behind him, does show his winning abilities and captures the imagination of all those others wanting to believe in a dream. But Seabiscuit’s victories are at smaller races. As such, Charles aims high and wants Seabiscuit to race Triple Crown winner War Admiral, who by all accounts is a winner and should be a winner. If given the chance to race against War Admiral (whose owner doesn’t want to race as he feels he has nothing to prove), will Seabiscuit and his team continue to keep the dreams of the common Americans alive? Through the good and the bad, especially as Red and Seabiscuit face mirroring problems, they all have to decide what is in their collective best interest.
Plot: True story of the undersized Depression-era racehorse whose victories lifted not only the spirits of the team behind it but also those of their nation.
Smart Tags: #horse_movie #animal_character_name_as_title #lawnmower #seabiscuit #horse #jockey #horse_racing #limp #racehorse #admiral #winning #marriage #death #underdog #horserace #vomiting #sex #horseshoe #reference_to_franklin_d._roosevelt #reference_to_william_wordsworth #reference_to_moby_dick


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Ratings:

Seabiscuit 2003 123movies 1Seabiscuit 2003 123movies 27.3/10 Votes: 67,174
Seabiscuit 2003 123movies 3Seabiscuit 2003 123movies 277%
Seabiscuit 2003 123movies 5Seabiscuit 2003 123movies 272/100
Seabiscuit 2003 123movies 7Seabiscuit 2003 123movies 27 Votes: 573 Popularity: 12.295

Reviews:

It wears its sentimental heart firmly on its fetlock.

As the depression era kicks in, Americans were grasping for any sort of inspiration they could get, enter equine supreme, Seabiscuit. Considered broken down, too small and untrainable, Seabiscuit went on to become a bastion of great racehorses and in the process bringing solace to those closest to it.

Back in 2003 upon its initial release, critics were very divided as to the merits of Seabiscuit as a picture. Some were concerned that this adaptation from Laura Hillenbrand’s highly thought of novel missed too many crucial elements, others were merely touting the tired old charge of the film purely baiting Oscar (something that is levelled at every film in history about hope and second chances), the more astute critics of the time however lauded it as the delightful and inspiring piece that it is.

It would be churlish of me to not agree that Seabiscuit is laced with sentiment, rookie director Gary Ross barely wastes a chance to tug the heart strings and paint an evocative sequence, but if you have got it in you to accept this true story for its base emotional point, then it is one hell of a wonderful experience. Seabiscuit is not just about the equine beauty of the picture, it’s also a fusion of three men’s personal wavering, who for one reason or another need the horse for far more important crutches than those provided by financial gain, make no bones about it, Seabiscuit is a very human drama. Knowing how the picture will end never once becomes a problem, because the historical accuracy in the story makes one yearn for that grandiose ending, one to gladden the heart in the way it must have done to thousands upon thousands of Americans back in the depression era day.

Ross wisely chooses to filter in as much realism as he possibly can, archive stills and narration serve as exceptional points of worth to the narrative structure. Then there is the first rate cast to fully form the emotional complexities that Seabiscuit provides. Jeff Bridges, Tobey Maguire (waif like), Chris Cooper, Elizabeth Banks, top American jockey Gary Stevens and a splendidly jaunty William H Macy, all can rightly feel proud of their respective work on this picture. Yet it’s with the thundering race sequences that Seabiscuit really triumphs best, magnificent beasts hurtling around the race track are excellently handled by Ross and his cinematographer, John Schwartzman, whilst a nod of approval must go to the sound department’s efforts, for this is definitely one to give your sub-woofer a work out.

Seabiscuit was nominated for seven Academy Awards, winning none, perhaps the Academy also felt like those critics who thought it was trying too hard for a Golden Statue? But now after the dust has settled some years later, it pays to revisit Seabiscuit and judge it on its own emotional terms, for it’s a tremendously well crafted picture that is of course as inspirational as it most assuredly is tender, a fine fine picture indeed. 9/10

Review By: John Chard Rating: 9 Date: 2019-05-26
***Hope for the broken via a quirky, forsaken race horse***

During the Depression, an undersized, “lazy” horse named Seabiscuit becomes a champion, lifting the spirits of both its team and that of the nation. Jeff Bridges plays the owner, Tobey Maguire the jockey and Chris Cooper the trainer. Valerie Mahaffey is on hand as the owner’s wife.

Based on the real story, “Seabiscuit” (2003) is reminiscent in tone of another timeless historical drama starring Bridges, “Tucker: The Man and His Dream” (1988) by Francis Ford Coppola. I prefer the underrated “Tucker” because it’s snappier and less vague, but “Seabiscuit” ain’t no slouch.

Like the historically-based “Jeremiah Johnson” (1972) the manner of storytelling respects the intelligence of the viewer to sometimes read between the lines. One of the best parts is the build-up to the race with War Admiral and the thrilling race itself. Not knowing the real-life events, a couple of the twists were surprising. The first act, however, seems bogged down by extraneous details about the owner.

The film runs 2 hour, 19 minutes and was shot in California, New York and Kentucky.

GRADE: B

Review By: Wuchak Rating: 7 Date: 2019-01-31
Triumphant conventionality
Roger Ebert says he has a theory that `people more readily cry at movies not because of sadness, but because of goodness and courage.’

This is certainly a reason why Gary Ross’s Seabiscuit tugs so effectively at the heartstrings. But the main one is the way the movie shows the triumph of the underdog spread fourfold among three men and a horse. And again the timing is right in the American release. Just as Danny Boyle’s 28 Days Later was delightful because it was a low budget movie that could compete with a lot of loud and dubious blockbusters, Seabiscuit earns our gratitude by being a blockbuster without explosions or exhibitionism, an epic of restraint, modesty and — yes — `goodness and courage.’ The loudest sound you hear is the starting bell for the races. There are those of us, mainstream folk, who’ve been starving for such fare. I saw people in the audience in the early matinee who plainly were alive in 1929 and 1938, and they wept and applauded throughout with awe and gratitude. We shall see how the younger generations respond.

An enthusiastic response is justified. There is nothing in Seabiscuit that’s very original; it awakens involuntary flashbacks to many traditional Rocky-esque sports biopics as one watches. But Gray and his chief collaborators, the talented author Lauren Hillenbrand and the splendid cast headed by Jeff Bridges, Chris Cooper, and co-producer Tobey McGuire, have nonetheless provided us with a quite wonderful movie, as much for its surefire writing and brilliant editing as for any of the acting.

Everyone must agree that the three men behind the most famous horse of his time are played by three of the best actors Hollywood now has to offer. Critics are in accord in saying Cooper’s performance is the subtlest and the most real: he models the principle that Less is More. Tobey McGuire isn’t given quite enough to do; his greatest accomplishment may be his lean look; he’s barely recognizable, and as a former redhead myself I don’t think the dye job is as bad as some have claimed. Bridges is, in his way, magnificent, but glossily iconic and therefore somewhat opaque. His resemblance to Franklin D. Roosevelt is pushed a bit too hard, as is the whole uplifting populist message – the `we didn’t fix the horse. He fixed us – and we fixed each other,’ and `sometimes all somebody needs is a second chance,’ stuff. (It’s pretty corny. But within the context of this beautifully made movie that believes in itself, we buy it.)

It’s important, anyway – if young people do come to see Seabiscuit – for them to get the simplified, but nonetheless just portrait of the times provided with authentic stills and footage, and the voiceover narration by iconic historian David (“The Civil War”) McCullough. The travelogue of the Depression and Prohibition years includes a quiet but heartfelt plug for FDR and that, too, is moving, especially in today’s post-Yuppie mood of numbingly exploitive jingoism.

Indeed each of the three actors gives a powerfully understated performance – they’re like thoroughbreds who’re never given their head – whose litotes (a word schoolboys learned back then) enhances the movie’s epic quality by never letting us forget that their triumphs were snatched from deprivation and adversity.

The long time devoted to the three men’s backgrounds early in the movie isn’t ill spent. It establishes the leisurely pace that is the essence of epic. But these back-stories aren’t as necessary as the filmmakers may have thought. And despite the slow movement, there isn’t deep detail. There’s barely one scene to establish Red Pollard’s (McGuire’s) literate, close-knit family before he’s cast (heartbreakingly) out of it. Charles Howard’s (Bridge’s) loss of his son is too telegraphic, though it’s a fine touch to show him wailing with the boy’s body but with his voice barely audible: it’s one more example of the movie’s sense of the period and of its restraint.

Right from the first the horse races are astonishing in the camera’s closeness and vividness, the way we feel the danger and physicality of the jockeys’ brutal competition with one another. Since we know Pollard is a failed prizefighter and general scrapper, we take in stride that fact that he’s physically fighting with other jockeys during the early races. This is a movie about horse racing and the races had better be terrific, and they are. It’s when we see the power of those sequences that we realize Seabiscuit has the makings of a popular classic.

Jeff Bridges’ performance in particular seems etched in stone. There are touches of Jimmy Stewart, Joseph Cotton, even Orson Welles in his role and his looks. The chameleon Bridges comes carrying traces of Coppola’s Tucker, but he has entered into the period and the tradition with utter conviction. Cooper’s austere minimalism, because it is the essential spirit of the movie, its understatement (litotes), is the central performance. He is a man who communicates better with horses than with men. McGuire’s performance is the noisiest, but he too reflects the social restraints of the period, and his wings are clipped before the final triumph can take place. This was a time when people had superiors and recognized it by calling them Sir and Mister. Everyone male wore a suit and tie, even jockeys off duty.

Seabiscuit’s ability to tug at the heartstrings first appears when Red Pollard is let go by his destitute father so he can be a jockey. The moment is deeply sad because what seems an act of heroic renunciation by a loving parent is in fact abandonment, and it feeds the young man’s rage thenceforth. And it’s more complex than that because it grows out of the enormous pressures of the Depression, a time when millions in America wandered westward deprived of everything but their cars and a few possessions.

Not only Bridges’ performance but whole sequences of Seabiscuit seem etched in stone and contain examples of textbook-perfect editing that possesses sweep and complexity and advances the story while keeping our focus on the prevailing mood.

This is, of course, the classic American story of triumph out of defeat and resolution out of conflict. As is a little too clearly pointed out, all three men, Charles Howard, Tom Smith, and Red Pollard, have had great devastation and loss in their lives (echoed by the whole country’s economic devastation, failure, and loss of nerve; and it’s implied — with some failure of restraint — that Seabiscuit’s underdog triumphs were as needed as the New Deal). Their horse was rescued by Smith (Chris Cooper) when it was going to be shot because it seemed unruly and untrainable. Out of all this failure and tragedy the men forge their victories: Seabiscuit, the horse that lacked breeding, was untrainable, and was `too small’; Pollard, abandoned by his parents, beaten in many prize fights, secretly blind in one eye and `too big’ to be a top jockey; Smith, a gifted horse tamer and trainer reduced to riding the rails and hoboing; Bridges, the self-made millionaire devastated by the destruction of all his hopes in a ruined economy and the sudden death of his young only son. They bond together to make Seabiscuit into one of the greatest racehorses in history. Who wouldn’t be moved by this? Only the conventional fat man who’s War Admiral’s snobbish Maryland owner. It’s all about heart, and Seabiscuit’s got it.

William H. Macy’s caricatured portrait of an alcoholic radio announcer is a highlight, in the sense of a bright spot on a painting. It’s a shrill and brittle performace that we tolerate because of the moments of relief Macy’s little comic vignettes provide. Subtlety is sacrificed to provide an effect, and to brush in a bit of humor amid all the earnestness. One only wishes there were more of a progression; that the character didn’t sip from the same bottle in every scene but got drunker, or soberer, as things went along.

We have to allow for the exigencies of filmmaking that required ten horses to be used for Seabiscuit, leading to the irony that this unique horse is a composite.

If you accept its conventionality, Seabiscuit is not just a good movie but a great one.

Review By: Chris Knipp Rating: Date: 2003-07-29
When Losers Have a Second Chance to Become Winners
After the American Depression, the millionaire Charles Howard (Jeff Bridges) gets married again with Marcela (Elizabeth Banks) and decides to invest in a race horse. He gathers the old couch Tom Smith (Chris Cooper), the problematic jockey Red Pollard (Tobey Maguire) and the horse Seabiscuit, all of them losers, and he believes on them, giving a second chance to them. Seabiscuit becomes a winner and legend in a difficult period of the American life. “Seabiscuit” is a beautiful film with positive and wonderful messages. Charles Howard has the best lines, such as: “When the little guy doesn’t know that he is little, he is capable of big things”; or, “Sometimes all somebody needs is a second chance”. The excellent and underrated actor Chris Cooper has probably his best performance along his career. Although having 141 minutes running time, the viewer does not feel time passing. I particularly liked not only the direction, performances, locations and reconstitution of a period, but mainly the never corny and very positive messages in the excellent lines and screenplay. My vote is eight.

Title (Brazil): “Seabiscuit – Alma de Herói” (“Seabiscuit – Soul of Hero”)

Review By: claudio_carvalho Rating: 8 Date: 2004-12-25

Other Information:

Original Title Seabiscuit
Release Date 2003-07-22
Release Year 2003

Original Language en
Runtime 2 hr 20 min (140 min)
Budget 87000000
Revenue 148336445
Status Released
Rated PG-13
Genre Drama, History, Sport
Director Gary Ross
Writer Laura Hillenbrand (book), Gary Ross (screenplay)
Actors David McCullough, Jeff Bridges, Paul Vincent O’Connor, Chris Cooper
Country USA
Awards Nominated for 7 Oscars. Another 6 wins & 37 nominations.
Production Company Kennedy/Marshall, Spyglass Entertainment
Website N/A


Technical Information:

Sound Mix DTS, Dolby Digital, SDDS
Aspect Ratio 2.39 : 1
Camera Arriflex 435 ES, Panavision Primo Lenses, Panavision Panaflex Platinum, Panavision Primo Lenses, Panavision Panastar II, Panavision Primo Lenses
Laboratory Technicolor, Hollywood (CA), USA
Film Length 3,851 m (Sweden)
Negative Format 35 mm (Kodak Vision2 500T 5218, Vision 200T 5274, Vision 500T 5279)
Cinematographic Process Digital Intermediate (2K) (master format), Super 35 (source format)
Printed Film Format 35 mm (anamorphic) (Kodak Vision 2383, Vision Premier 2393)

Seabiscuit 2003 123movies
Original title Seabiscuit
TMDb Rating 7 573 votes

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