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The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader 2010 123movies

The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader 2010 123movies

Return to magic. Return to hope. Return to Narnia.113 Min.
Your rating: 0
6 1 vote

Summary:

#123movies #fmovies #putlocker #gomovies #solarmovie #soap2day Watch Full Movie Online Free – Lucy and Edmund Pevensie are stranded in Cambridge, living in the house of their obnoxious cousin Eustace, while the grown-ups Susan and Peter are living in the USA with their parents. When a painting of a ship sailing on the sea of Narnia overflows water in their room, Lucy, Edmund and Eustace are transported to the ocean of Narnia and rescued by King Caspian and the crew of the ship The Dawn Treader. Caspian explains that Narnia has been in peace for three years but before he took his throne back, his uncle tried to kill the seven lords of Telmar, who were the closest and most loyal friends of his father. They fled to The Lone Island and no one has ever heard anything about them. Now Caspian is seeking out the lords of Telmar with his Captain Drinian, the talking mouse Reepicheep and his loyal men. Soon, they discover that an evil form of green mist is threatening Narnia and the siblings and their cousin join Caspian in a quest to retrieve the seven swords of the seven lords of Telmar to save Narnia from evil.
Plot: This time around Edmund and Lucy Pevensie, along with their pesky cousin Eustace Scrubb find themselves swallowed into a painting and on to a fantastic Narnian ship headed for the very edges of the world.
Smart Tags: #sequel #third_part #the_white_witch_character #lucy_pevensie_character #minotaur_character #peter_pevensie_character #aslan_character #susan_pevensie_character #ocean #father_son_reunion #boat #brother_sister_relationship #ship #destiny #dog #animal #father_son_relationship #male_and_female_protagonists #battleaxe #live_action_and_animation #action_hero


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Ratings:

The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader 2010 123movies 1The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader 2010 123movies 26.3/10 Votes: 142,721
The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader 2010 123movies 3The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader 2010 123movies 250%
The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader 2010 123movies 5The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader 2010 123movies 253/100
The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader 2010 123movies 7The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader 2010 123movies 26.4 Votes: 4283 Popularity: 26.856

Reviews:

Growing up in the Canada in the 70’s and 80’s, I fondly recall vastly enjoying an animated version of Lewis’ ‘The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe’ that was presented by Kraft on CTV. Now as a father of a son, I want to see with him the contemporary versions of the books I adored in my youth, though at present I greatly prefer the craftsmanship of cinema pre-1970.

It never bothers me in the slightest, to the ire of my more obsessive-compulsive cinephilic friends, seeing films of series with complete disregard to their order (one of my friends nearly had a heart attack, when he discovered I had watched ‘Spider-Man 3’ without having previously watched films 1 and 2–don’t even get me started about the ‘Harry Potter’ series…), so, especially curious about how one of my favourite contemporary directors, Michael Apted, would do in the realm of big-budget, CGI-intensive fantasy filmmaking (I expected a fish-out-of-water, like Lord Richard Attenborough helming ‘A Chorus Line’), I gave this a shot.

I enjoyed this more than ‘Harry Potter’ films I have seen, though it does stretch things from the literary works, but unfortunately, that seems to be the way things are, since film became less about artistry and more about business (just see at Toys R Us how many possible toys you can purchase, and similar commercial off-shoots, and I don’t even consider this series a major player in this sort of area, because of its Christian undertones, which really doesn’t mesh perfectly with selling tons of toys, though of course the realms aren’t mutually exclusive, not by any stretch of the imagination). I think that Apted did a decent job, especially considering that yes, he is a fine director, but this isn’t really his cup of tea. I distinctly feel that if these films are your comfort food, you won’t be disappointed. I look forward to checking out the series’ two preceding entries, and, though they left an opportunity for more films, which I believe wouldn’t be from Lewis’ works at all, it was a nice summation at its conclusion.

Finally, it was great to see (or at the very least, hear) Tilda Swinton, Liam Neeson and Simon Pegg, they seem to be thrown in everything these days. I heartily salute their agents–they must have the very best in the business.

Review By: talisencrw Rating: 8 Date: 2016-04-12
In the immortal words of Col. Kurtz, “The horror…the horror.” Marlon Brando wasn’t speaking of this film, of course, but rather the horrors of the Vietnam War. The sentiment remains applicable.

When I write reviews, I do try to give at least a modicum of context, be it a history of the film itself, predecessors to its place in cinema history, or my general feelings on the type of film. In this case, I’ve just referenced Francis Ford Coppola’s classic take on Joseph Conrad’s “Heart of Darkness,” Apocalypse Now. What does that have to do with Dawn Treader? Nothing, and I couldn’t be happier. Why? Because it’s distracted my mind with thoughts of a far, far better film. Allow me my few moments of happiness before I have to rifle through the dark filing cabinet of my mind to marshal my thoughts on this atrocity.\

What went so wrong here, you may ask? We’ll start with the history of this franchise. I do not have the highest opinion of this series. We started out with the most famous of C. S. Lewis’ Narnia cycle, The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe. I don’t know…perhaps if we hadn’t been in the middle of such a fantasy film renaissance, I would have found it more palatable. Instead, coming on the heels of Peter Jackson’s generation-defining Lord of the Rings trilogy, and the high class and quality of the Harry Potter franchise, that weak take on a book series that didn’t thrill me as a child struck me as a cheap, childish appetizer compared to the magnificent feasts audiences had already been served, their stories facile, their acting (aside from a typically great Tilda Swinton) either poor or phoned-in (Paging Mr. Neeson, your paycheck is waiting for you). SHREK co-director Andrew Adamson was the helmer of both Wardrobe and Caspian, and I had hoped those film’s failings were due perhaps to his inexperience as a director of live-action. The first film of course wore its Christian allegory on its sleeve (Lewis, for all his writings, never managed to find the definition of “subtle”), and it found favor with the churchgoing crowd, whose turnout afforded it a huge box office windfall. The second film was more of a straight actioner (in the vein of Star Wars Episode I, which is to say the supposed action was mired in a swamp of facile and achingly dull political machinations), and didn’t find purchase with the same demographic, and box office returns were disappointingly low. Disney, who had financed the films, saw the writing on the wall, and dropped the series. That should have been the end of it.

Until 20th Century Fox stepped in. Now, let’s remember: Fox doesn’t have the best track record with adapting beloved fantasy series into films (a moment of silence for the tragedies that were The Dark is Rising and Eregon, please). Hiring Michael Apted as the director seemed to be bucking the trend of shoveling out crap. Apted isn’t really known as an action, fantasy, or epic film director, but he showed promise with the last Pierce Brosnan/James Bond film, The World is Not Enough (I’ll not blame him for Denise Richards’…nuclear physicist…sigh). Still, director in place, 20th Century Fox and Walden Media cobbled together another Narnia adventure, and the results were predictably terrible.

Honestly, I wish I hadn’t expected a poor film going in. Because this film not only met but exceeded my expectations of terrible, and it’s not because I was pre-judging it. It’s because it was simply that bad. The plot is nonsensical, randomly shunting characters from one loosely-connected vignette to the next, with hokey dialogue and dire predictions of eeeevil standing in for actual menace or intrigue. It’s a shaggy dog road trip story, waterlogged on a boat, and I found myself half an hour in wishing desperately that the characters would all get scurvy and die.

The plot’s so thinly-sketched that I may as well not even try to recount it here, but it has something to do with two of the kids from previous films being once again pulled into Narnia at absolute random, with no thematic or plot reason for any of the nonsense in the first place. Once there, our cast is rounded out with their exceptionally annoying cousin, and despite no one knowing quite what’s going on, they stumble upon the titular character of the second film, Prince Caspian, and join him on his completely random quest to recover seven old friends of his long-dead father who disappeared for some reason, and no one knows why. So they fight an island made of evil. Good wins, evil is defeated, the end. Please, let it be the end.

Listen: I love fantasy. I love science fiction, I love horror, I love all of the outr√© genres, the fantastic, the unreal. It fascinates me, and I love wrapping myself in the trappings of the genre like a favored blanket, letting their comforting warmth wash over me in waves of escapism and nostalgia. But this half-assed bunch of hokum had me rolling my eyes, with the stilted dialogue and the hastily-sketched characters and the nonsensical plot and the ARGH it’s too much.

The icing on this crap cake was the ham-handed, in-no-uncertain-terms Christian allegory with which the film beat the audience over the head with all the grace, power, and strength of an industrial-size sledgehammer. Yes, the evil was SIN. And Aslan is JESUS. Who exists as a lion in an alternate universe or something, apparently. Who pulls children into this alternate universe at random for…no apparent reason whatsoever (the film explicitly states that it’s “to know Him (Aslan i.e. Jesus, in case you didn’t already pick up on that) better,” but if that’s the case, why just these four kids? What’s the thematic point of this? Why were the elder kids now judged worthy of not having watery allegory poured down their throats again? What did these kids learn at the end of this film that made them better people?

ARGH again. I cannot even begin to catalogue the problems with this series, from either the internal “logic” of the series or the external logic of the human brain. Doing so only hurts my head.

Remember how I said the second film in the series lacked the ham-fisted Christian allegory of the first? Well, 20th Century Fox apparently recognized the church-going demographic was what made the first film such a success, and had them ramp up the religious content from “allegory” to “explicit yelling at the audience and rubbing its nose in it like it’s a puppy who peed on the carpet.” This sentiment struck me as wholly insincere, a manufactured “message” shoehorned in by a film studio who wanted nothing more than to reap the box office rewards of the first film which felt, though unsubtle, genuine in its intentions.

I’ve seen films more poorly shot, more poorly acted, more poorly assembled. But this boring, useless, preachy slog with no purpose or point had me at the absolute end of my rope. Rare is it that I sit in a darkened theater constantly looking at my watch, biding my time, aching for the dross on the screen to end so that I simply don’t have to endure it anymore. But that’s exactly what happened with this film.

Before anyone jumps on the obvious point of attack, let me say in no uncertain terms that I am Christian. But (and this is an exceptionally important point) just because a the message of a particular film/book/song/etc. is Christian doesn’t make the work inherently good. Nor does criticism of the work in some way equal an anti-Christian sentiment. I often feel that works perceived as “Christian” get a free pass on quality because of their message, but quality doesn’t work like that. Lowering one’s standards results only in mediocre pablum like this continuing to be passed off for media conglomerates to make a quick, insincere buck. Do me a favor. If you’ve enjoyed these films, fine. I whole-heartedly disagree, but I’m certainly not going to tell you you’re wrong for enjoying them. But I beg of you: Don’t shut off the critical area of your brain just because something agrees with your worldview. Doing so is a disservice not only to yourself, but everyone else like you who has to suffer through trash like this.

Review By: Matt Golden Rating: Date: 2013-07-21
Visually Outstanding. A decent movie overall
It’s been an overdose of fantasy for me in the last few days I guess. First, in anticipation of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part I, I watched all the previous ones at a stretch. For this, I had to do a similar thing. Else how would it make any sense ??? The Narnia series, it seems, is shaping up to be the replacement of the Harry Potter series. We all know that Harry Potter is gonna be done with by the next year. That will leave us with the Narnia series, and with four more movies to go, I suppose that’s gonna last a long while till another fantasy movie series pops up.

The movie begins with the Pevensies being transported to Narnia “least when they expected”. This time, they have their cousin Eustace with them who takes some time to accepting the Narnian world filled with talking creatures and other such wonders. He reacts similar to how the Pevensies did when they first saw Narnia, only he’s more scared than surprised. Since they’ve landed in Narnia unexpectedly, there has to be a reason for it. And there is, and a supposedly good one – one which will not only test their battling skills what with dragons, serpents and storms on the way, but also bring them face to face with their inner demons and fears.

As far as the similarity of the movie’s plot with the book goes, I frankly admit to having no idea regarding that. I’ve viewed the movie as a movie, as a sequel to the first two and as such, won’t be able to comment on how well the movie follows the plot of the book. On the surface of it however, the plot is fairly basic but filled with too many characters to confuse someone who isn’t familiar with the books. All the cast members perform well though the star of the show has to be Reepicheep the mouse – he is so endearing that you’d often find yourself rooting for him. And then again there’s Aslan the Lion who, in my opinion, is the best (CGI) wonder ever created in the Narnian movie universe. His mere presence in a frame makes it stand out. He appears responsible, wise, calm and like a father figure to the Pevensies and others – the character is so greatly conceived that his mere sight makes you respect him. He truly has the aura of a king and rightfully deserves to be one. And Liam Neeson does a fabulous job of voicing him as do the animators on making him appear life-like. And when the soft and soothing background score plays in the background during his presence, you’re bound to feel a lump in your throat. You’ll definitely hear a child scream “Aslan” in the movie theater when he first arrives.

Visually, the film is simply outstanding. Such is the richness of the effects that it makes me wonder how on earth can the film be made on a budget of “just” $140 million. I mean, the amount of visual effects present in the film and the quality of each shot is simply brilliant – from the dragon to the serpent to the wide shots of The Dawn Treader to the Islands to the waves to Reepicheep the mouse and finally, the great Aslan. Lighting, it seems has improved to the point that it is difficult to tell what is CGI and what is real. The main musical themes have been recycled from the past films which is a great thing since those themes were simply heart touching, especially Aslan’s. The set design is also good although as mentioned, it is hard to distinguish between real and digital sets.

Like many movies with excessive VFX, the movie tends to give a slightly more focus to the effects (maybe because it is a children centric film). Although made for children, adults shouldn’t find this a reason to stay away from the movie. The movie might tend to get a bit boring at times. And the biggest drawback of the movie is the 3-D which, quite simply, is as good as not there. By all means, you’d be better saving some bucks and watching the movie in 2-D; it might as well also save you a headache. As a matter of fact, the commercial shown during my movie screening had better 3-D that that found in this movie. Despite its drawbacks, it is a good movie and can make for a good viewing with / without family. If not for anything else, I recommend it, For Aslan !!!

Score: 6.5 / 10

Review By: KrazzyDJ Rating: 6 Date: 2010-12-04
As always, it’s stylishly produced, but most of the magic of the first two films seems to have been lost.
Today, I checked out the latest entry of the Chronicles of Narnia film franchise based on the books by C.S. Lewis, The Voyage of the Dawn Treader.

In this film, Edmund and Lucy Pevensie are currently taking shelter in a home owned by their uncle. But, through the magic of a mysterious painting, they’re suddenly brought back into Narnia, and brought aboard the Dawn Treader, the strongest ship of the Narnia armada, but they also bring along their cousin, Eustace. With the help of Caspian, they seek seven legendary swords that can destroy a mysterious new enemy, a deadly green mist.

The film makes good use of its cast, and their performances are fine, and do their best to carry the film. Just like the first two films, Dawn Treader is handsomely produced, boasting impressive production design, costumes, makeup, sound design, and special effects, and some great battle sequences, such as a daring escape from slave traders, and a nail biting final battle with ferocious sea serpents.

But you know what? Those things can’t save the film from it’s pretty big faults. Most of the magic that seemed to make the first film, and to a lesser extent the second film, so special seems to have been lost through the film’s unfocused narrative. This time around the magic feels kind of generic. I also found the editing by Rick Shaine to be inconsistent, as the pace of the film tends to hop infrequently between slow and developmental, to fast and offbeat.

As for David Arnold’s score, not only was it a big no no to fire Harry Gregson-Williams, but his score also gets a little derivative at times. I couldn’t help but be reminded of Pirates of the Caribbean and Edward Scissorhands at points. There’s also a somewhat distracting end credits country tune performed by Carrie Underwood, which by itself is quite lovely, but in the context of the film, feels out of place to the fantasy of Narnia.

It really does seem like the series has gotten worse with each new film. Either the film makers need to get their acts together (And hire a new editor), or they need to hand it to more capable hands.

I give Voyage of the Dawn Treader ** out of ****

Review By: Ryan_MYeah Rating: 5 Date: 2010-12-15

Other Information:

Original Title The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader
Release Date 2010-12-02
Release Year 2010

Original Language en
Runtime 1 hr 53 min (113 min)
Budget 155000000
Revenue 415686217
Status Released
Rated PG
Genre Adventure, Family, Fantasy
Director Michael Apted
Writer Christopher Markus (screenplay), Stephen McFeely (screenplay), Michael Petroni (screenplay), C.S. Lewis (novel)
Actors Georgie Henley, Skandar Keynes, Ben Barnes, Will Poulter
Country USA, UK
Awards Nominated for 1 Golden Globe. Another 2 wins & 17 nominations.
Production Company Mark Johnson, Dune
Website N/A


Technical Information:

Sound Mix Dolby Digital, DTS, Dolby Surround 7.1, SDDS
Aspect Ratio 1.78 : 1 (Blu-ray & DVD), 2.39 : 1 (theatrical ratio)
Camera Sony CineAlta F23
Laboratory Ascent 142 Features (digital intermediate)
Film Length 3,197 m (Portugal, 35mm)
Negative Format Video (HDTV)
Cinematographic Process Digital Intermediate (2K) (master format), HDCAM SR (1080p/24) (source format)
Printed Film Format 35 mm (anamorphic) (Fuji Eterna-CP 3523XD), D-Cinema (also 3-D version)

The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader 2010 123movies
The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader 2010 123movies
The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader 2010 123movies
The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader 2010 123movies
The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader 2010 123movies
The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader 2010 123movies
The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader 2010 123movies
The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader 2010 123movies
The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader 2010 123movies
The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader 2010 123movies
Original title The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader
TMDb Rating 6.4 4,283 votes

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