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The Long Good Friday 1980 123movies

The Long Good Friday 1980 123movies

Who lit the fuse that tore Harold's world apart?114 Min.
Your rating: 0
5 1 vote

Summary:

#123movies #fmovies #putlocker #gomovies #solarmovie #soap2day Watch Full Movie Online Free – Harold, a prosperous English gangster, is about to close a lucrative new deal when bombs start showing up in very inconvenient places. A mysterious syndicate is trying to muscle in on his action, and Harold wants to know who they are. He finds out soon enough, and bloody mayhem ensues.
Plot: In the late 1970s, Cockney crime boss Harold Shand, a gangster trying to become a legitimate property mogul, has big plans to get the American Mafia to bankroll his transformation of a derelict area of London into the possible venue for a future Olympic Games. However, a series of bombings targets his empire on the very weekend the Americans are in town. Shand is convinced there is a traitor in his organization, and sets out to eliminate the rat in typically ruthless fashion.
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Ratings:

The Long Good Friday 1980 123movies 1 The Long Good Friday 1980 123movies 27.6/10 Votes: 19,352
The Long Good Friday 1980 123movies 3 The Long Good Friday 1980 123movies 296%
The Long Good Friday 1980 123movies 5 The Long Good Friday 1980 123movies 2N/A
The Long Good Friday 1980 123movies 7 The Long Good Friday 1980 123movies 27.3 Votes: 189 Popularity: 11.53

Reviews:

1970’s Gangsters – London style.
This film opens with several disjointed scenes that leaves the viewer a little breathless and confused: A chauffeur murdered in his car, two men counting cash in a suitcase who are subsequently murdered, a man being knifed in a swimming club and a car bomb exploding outside of a church. We are able to catch up as the story slowly reveals itself but this one does require some viewer participation. While a very intelligent and well scripted film, the action is intense, the body count high and the violence more graphic than is usual for a British film of its era.

The central character in this crime drama is Harold Shand, a highly successful East End gangster who has just returned to London after a business trip to the U.S. Upon his return he finds his mob under attack, several of his employees killed and his organization the target of an unknown foe. Meanwhile he’s trying to put together a semi-legit real estate deal, with American Mafia participation. Harold has to keep his American friends from getting nervous with an all out war going on and get to the bottom of whatever has gone wrong while he was away.

Harold is aided in all of this by the classiest moll ever: Victoria. She’s beautiful, educated, well-mannered and high class (she brags that she went to school with Princess Anne). Her cool as ice exterior is quit the contrast to the crude thug, Harold, who fancies himself a businessman and hobnobs with politicians and legitimate entrepreneurs but is really only a tough Cockney hood (or ‘ood as they say). Victoria tries to handle the Americans while Harold and his mob round up the usual suspects in an attempt to find out where the heat is coming from. Harold is at once a ruthless brute and a lovable and vulnerable little man and by the end of the movie it’s easy to find yourself falling for him. He actually has real affection for his crew and treats them as family. This may leave him exposed as, like most movie gangsters, his arrogance and belief in his own invincibility are what will bring him down.

Bob Hoskins, in his first starring role, plays Harold in a performance that conjures up images of other little big men of the silver screen like Edward G. Robinson or James Cagney in some of their great gangster roles. While not as well known as his award winning role in the under appreciated “Mona Lisa”, it is the one that put Hoskins on the map. Victoria is played by Helen Mirren and it’s hard to take your eye off of her in all of her scenes. Helen was a very good looking girl in her day and was already an established star (having survived her role in “Caligula”). Eddie Constantine, Europe’s favorite American, plays the American mafioso and a young Pierce Brosnan, in his first movie, plays an IRA killer.

The plot is a bit complex with a lot of characters to keep track of and the almost incomprehensible Cockney accents and slang are hard to follow (subtitles are helpful for non-Brits). But the story moves along smartly, the direction is very good and the lighting and photography excellent. This film is well done from its start to its memorable conclusion and is highly recommended.

Review By: jgcole Rating: 8 Date: 2011-01-25
The 1980s begins with a bang
WARNING – THIS REVIEW DISCUSSES THE ENDING OF THE FILM AT LENGTH.

Portraying Britain at the dawn of Thatcherism, The Long Good Friday presents its central character and itself like a spinning coin, looking towards the future but always about to slip back into the past, about to go one way or the other. Harold Shand (Bob Hoskins) tells nostalgic and emotional stories about his National Service (which had been abolished for almost two decades when this film was made) and how he began his career as a street urchin An hour earlier, he had been proclaiming his glorious vision of 1980s Britain while – in a rather unsubtle piece of direction – framed by Tower Bridge. This world of opposites is expressed most clearly in Francis Monkman’s zesty score, blending traditional classical instruments with Moroder-style synth-pop. It is ultimately hubris, the kind of overconfidence normally associated with ’80s excess, that delivers Shand helplessly into the maw of a truly monstrous enemy that had existed for decades.

Not as complex as I’ve heard it made out (admittedly the DVD age means I can zip straight to the exposition scenes without effort, which helps), The Long Good Friday is still a breathtakingly audacious film and one that at times runs a real risk of alienating its audience while still retaining mass appeal. It blends together elements of various crime subgenres: it takes the criminal-turns-detective idea from Get Carter and marries it to the sickly, sleazy decadence that Scarface would portray so unflinchingly three years later, while the outlandish, ostentatious tactics Shand employs to intimidate his enemies come straight from The Godfather. Harold Shand is essentially a Tony Montana-style character: someone not very bright who has gone from poor to rich very quickly and doesn’t know what to do with his loot, who thinks that money somehow equals invincibility. As his enemies continue to undermine his modern-man fantasy (he refers to himself as a businessman, not a criminal) he becomes steadily more delusional to the point where he eventually expresses an intent to wipe out the entire IRA. This is a self-evidently absurd statement that Shand takes totally seriously, immediately before slashing his most trusted lieutenant’s jugular with a broken bottle, as Hoskins’s incandescent performance charts the erosion of the character’s veneer of sophistication. As the first two members of his gang are assassinated he asks himself who could make him and his associates a target: a legitimate question in the circumstances, but the emotional burst with which Hoskins delivers the sentiment suggests less a rational question and more a little child screaming that “IT’S NOT FAIR!”.

Now, the IRA. Before September 11 2001 they were synonymous with terrorism in the UK and their omnipresent threat throughout the 1970s led to London becoming one of the most CCTV-heavy cities in the world. No wonder the film’s original backers got cold feet, since while it doesn’t in any way romanticise them it does portray them as the very essence of power. Against them Shand – no small fry in his own right – is nothing at all and even his ice-cold mistress (Helen Mirren) cracks under the threat against her despite being able to effortlessly parry the advances of Shand’s lecherous thugs. But here’s the twist: the whole thing’s totally pointless.

This is what makes the film so daring. Virtually the entire film concerns the quest for Hichcock’s MacGuffin, which in this case is defined by its absence: it is the answer to the mystery itself. The IRA are fingered fairly quickly, but the question is why. Keeping this question unanswered for so long rather than giving hints occasionally requires a predictably huge scene of exposition, which is totally subverted when it turns out that Shand hasn’t actually done anything at all. The IRA mistakenly believe he is responsible for the murder of some of their agents and once fanatics get an idea in their heads that idea stays there. I can’t think of another film that has its central premise turn to fairy-dust so spectacularly – not even The Maltese Falcon. This I think is where it risks losing its audience, because everything turns out to be so pointless. Is that dramatically satisfying? In the event yes, because rather than going into hiding (like Michael Corleone in the first Godfather) Shand’s feathers get ruffled even more and, the irony apparently lost on him, he kills two IRA agents for real and is tracked down and captured within minutes. As he’s driven away, almost certainly to his death, we get an extended close-up of Hoskins’s face. Among the despair and panic, there’s the occasional flicker of an impression that he’s finally got the joke.

With complex characters, great writing, scintillating performances and a brave, uncompromising attitude to storytelling conventions, The Long Good Friday is an essential piece of British cinema.

Review By: ed_zeppelin Rating: 10 Date: 2007-08-11

Other Information:

Original Title The Long Good Friday
Release Date 1980-11-01
Release Year 1980

Original Language en
Runtime 1 hr 54 min (114 min)
Budget 0
Revenue 0
Status Released
Rated R
Genre Crime, Drama, Mystery, Thriller
Director John Mackenzie
Writer Barrie Keeffe
Actors Paul Freeman, Leo Dolan, Kevin McNally, Patti Love
Country UK
Awards Nominated for 1 BAFTA Film Award. Another 2 wins & 1 nomination.
Production Company N/A
Website N/A


Technical Information:

Sound Mix Mono
Aspect Ratio 1.85 : 1
Camera N/A
Laboratory Rank Film Laboratories, Denham, UK
Film Length 3,135 m (Sweden)
Negative Format 35 mm
Cinematographic Process Spherical
Printed Film Format 35 mm

The Long Good Friday 1980 123movies
The Long Good Friday 1980 123movies
Original title The Long Good Friday
TMDb Rating 7.3 189 votes

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