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The Petrified Forest 1936 123movies

The Petrified Forest 1936 123movies

AGAIN THEY TRIUMPH!...The stars of 'Human Bondage' in a picture greater than the play!Feb. 08, 193682 Min.
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7 1 vote

Synopsis

#123movies #fmovies #putlocker #gomovies #solarmovie #soap2day Watch Full Movie Online Free – Gabby lives and works at her dads small diner out in the desert. She can’t stand it and wants to go and live with her mother in France. Along comes Alan, a broke man with no will to live, who is traveling to see the pacific, and maybe to drown in it. Meanwhile Duke Mantee a notorious killer and his gang is heading towards the diner where Mantee plan on meeting up with his girl.
Plot: Gabby, the waitress in an isolated Arizona diner, dreams of a bigger and better life. One day penniless intellectual Alan drifts into the joint and the two strike up a rapport. Soon enough, notorious killer Duke Mantee takes the diner’s inhabitants hostage. Surrounded by miles of desert, the patrons and staff are forced to sit tight with Mantee and his gang overnight.
Smart Tags: #diner #drifter #intellectual #artist #self_destructiveness #african_american #love_triangle #shootout #old_man #on_the_run #writer #desert #arizona #gas_station #insurance_policy #inheritance #self_sacrifice #great_depression #based_on_play #title_spoken_by_character #hitchhiker


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Ratings:

The Petrified Forest 1936 123movies 1 The Petrified Forest 1936 123movies 27.5/10 Votes: 12,639
The Petrified Forest 1936 123movies 3 The Petrified Forest 1936 123movies 2100%
The Petrified Forest 1936 123movies 5 The Petrified Forest 1936 123movies 2N/A
The Petrified Forest 1936 123movies 7 The Petrified Forest 1936 123movies 27.1 Votes: 116 Popularity: 6.868

Reviews:

The Dreams of the Discontented
“The Petrified Forest” (Archie Mayo, 1936) is most fascinating for its eager willingness to voice criticisms of wealth, power, authority, and inequality in America. Perhaps its acute social commentary should be unsurprising considering that Warner Brothers released the romantic crime drama during the depths of the Great Depression, but it is freshly relevant just the same, striking a note that would not be witnessed in the films of the forties and fifties. In speaking to the exploitation of workers, the snobbery of corporatism, the repression of women, blacks, artists, and literary poets, the reign of gangland crime, the American government’s complicit abuse of power, and the loss of individuality in an increasingly meek age, “The Petrified Forest” manages an equal-opportunity iconoclasm that belies any party affiliations. Simply put, the film is unafraid to criticize America, and it’s that sense of freedom that makes it particularly delightful. Best of all, “The Petrified Forest” voices its dissent through colorful witticisms and engaging banter, never taking itself too seriously or losing its sense of humor.

“The Petrified Forest” is also particularly notable for marking Humphrey Bogart’s first major screen role as the nominal villain and escaped gangster Duke Mantee. The unshaven, pompadour-sporting Bogart is leering and menacing, brooding and growling and glowering, projecting the lonely, hard-bitten cynicism that would soon become his trademark. At the same time, however, he also emerges as a sympathetic and noble figure, one who transcends his criminal trappings through a fierce sense of integrity and individuality. Not only did these hard-boiled character traits become the template for the Bogart persona, but they also serve as a source of magnetism within the film’s social milieu. Aside from the corporate oilman (Mr. Chisholm, played by Paul Harvey), Duke Mantee’s hostages in a desert diner come to admire and salute his rugged individualism and defiance of the status quo, even as he endangers their lives. They yearn for the empowering resistance that he embodies and the gritty social rebelliousness that he wears on his prickly face, and when the film, before its final shootout, labels the confrontation as “Duke Mantee vs. the American government,” it’s clear that the sympathies of its principal characters reside with the Duke.

“The Petrified Forest” is also noteworthy for the dynamic contrast between its two black characters. One of them (Joseph, played by John Alexander) is virtually the embodiment of the pre-sixties Hollywood stereotype, a meek, shuffling, subservient chauffeur who always looks to his wealthy boss for paternalistic approval before opening his mouth. The other (Slim, played by Slim Thompson) is one of Duke Mantee’s gangster associates, and he’s clearly a liberated, autonomous, independent soul who offers his opinions on his own accord while mocking his “colored brother” for his subservience. He’s almost a figure out of 1966 rather than 1936, and the difference between these two black men highlights the social conflict that the film heeds. On one side is the ruggedly individualistic and socially defiant Duke Mantee and a black man who marches to his own beat; on the other is a fat cat corporate tycoon and his docile and emasculated black servant, who, in turn, represent the American status quo. And so while Mantee and his gangsters are nominally the villains of “The Petrified Forest,” at heart they constitute the film’s heroes and rousing saviors. They are the men who obliquely brighten the hopeless despair and repressed frustrations of a trapped waitress who is secretly a talented painter (Gabby Maple, played by Bette Davis) and a fatalistically passionate French drifter-poet who is hitching his way to the Pacific Ocean (Alan Squier, played by Leslie Howard). They also seem to enliven several of the other repressed characters, from the restless wife of the cowardly tycoon (Mrs. Edith Chisholm, played by Genevieve Tobin), to an ex-college football player struggling to release his pent-up energies (Nick, played by Eddie Acuff), to an old man who longs for Billy the Kid, Mark Twain, and the legendary individualists of a bygone era (Gramp Maple, played by Charley Grapewin).

To be sure, the film doesn’t explicitly paint Duke Mantee and his fellow gangsters as heroic saviors, but it’s clear where the film’s sympathies lie.

Ultimately “The Petrified Forest” is about an umbrella of misfits and their discontent with the repressive and exploitative American establishment, and it’s that pulse of iconoclasm that keeps it audacious and provocative after all these decades.

Review By: gmatcallahan Rating: Date: 2004-08-15
An amazingly relevant piece of cinema…
The best context to look at “The Petrified Forest” is through the context of the first great disaster of the 20th Century: World War I (or, as it was known then, “The Great War”). I had just finished reading a long, thorough history of World War I when I saw this one and even though this is some twenty years after that awful catastrophe (all wars usually are, but this one especially), one can still feel it’s aftershocks rolling through that desolate landscape. Maybe that’s why Leslie Howard’s character, Alan Squier, wound up wandering through there, as it probably reminded him of more than a few days and nights in No Man’s Land (a term invented by the Great War to describe the space between enemy lines). A lot of non-American WWI veterans came out of it really messed up. The whole foundation of the 19th century’s ideals had been laid to waste by this new and brutal world that WWI brought about. So it’s not very suprising to me that Squier feels “obsolete”, as he puts it; the role he had hoped to take with his world doesn’t even exist. The best he can do is give Gabrielle Maple the chance he can never have.

Duke Mantee (played by Bogie in a superb, breakthrough performance) is also a relic, but from a different period, that of the Roaring Twenties. Not for nothing were such outlaws as John Dillenger and Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow glamourized during this period; one could possibly point to our current fascination with serial killers as this phenomenon’s modern equivalent. But by 1936, the period of the romantic outlaw was drawing to a close if it wasn’t already over (a point made five years later in “High Sierra”). Mantee is totally without hope of escape or even a reprieve. He sees his fate as clear as day and doesn’t kid himself about his chances of eluding it forever. That, more than anything, would explain his rapproachment with Squier and perhaps his reluctance to shoot him until Squier gives him no choice. Mantee may know his own fate well enough, but he has no wish to inflict that fate on someone in the same position.

Granted, there’s a lot more layers and angles going on in “The Petrified Forest” than what I’ve just mentioned here, but this was the one that grabbed the most. Because human nature doesn’t change that much, perhaps that’s why this brilliant stage piece still holds my respect.

Review By: keihan Rating: 8 Date: 2000-06-01

Other Information:

Original Title The Petrified Forest
Release Date 1936-02-08
Release Year 1936

Original Language en
Runtime 1 hr 22 min (82 min) (Turner library print)
Budget 0
Revenue 0
Status Released
Rated Passed
Genre Crime, Drama, Romance, Thriller
Director Archie Mayo
Writer Charles Kenyon (screen play), Delmer Daves (screen play), Robert E. Sherwood (play)
Actors Leslie Howard, Bette Davis, Genevieve Tobin, Dick Foran
Country USA
Awards N/A
Production Company Warner Bros.
Website N/A


Technical Information:

Sound Mix Mono
Aspect Ratio 1.37 : 1
Camera N/A
Laboratory N/A
Film Length (8 reels), 2,296 m (Netherlands)
Negative Format 35 mm
Cinematographic Process Spherical
Printed Film Format 35 mm

The Petrified Forest 1936 123movies
Original title The Petrified Forest
TMDb Rating 7.1 116 votes

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