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Fight Club 1999 123movies

Fight Club 1999 123movies

Mischief. Mayhem. Soap.Oct. 15, 1999139 Min.
Your rating: 0
9 1 vote

Synopsis

#123movies #fmovies #putlocker #gomovies #solarmovie #soap2day Watch Full Movie Online Free – A nameless first person narrator (Edward Norton) attends support groups in attempt to subdue his emotional state and relieve his insomniac state. When he meets Marla (Helena Bonham Carter), another fake attendee of support groups, his life seems to become a little more bearable. However when he associates himself with Tyler (Brad Pitt) he is dragged into an underground fight club and soap making scheme. Together the two men spiral out of control and engage in competitive rivalry for love and power. When the narrator is exposed to the hidden agenda of Tyler’s fight club, he must accept the awful truth that Tyler may not be who he says he is.
Plot: A ticking-time-bomb insomniac and a slippery soap salesman channel primal male aggression into a shocking new form of therapy. Their concept catches on, with underground “fight clubs” forming in every town, until an eccentric gets in the way and ignites an out-of-control spiral toward oblivion.
Smart Tags: #fighting #surprise_ending #anti_establishment #insomnia #multiple_personality_disorder #based_on_novel #group_therapy #anti_conformity #anti_capitalism #disturbed_individual #ikea #black_comedy #graphic_violence #self_destructiveness #suicide_attempt #consumerism #plot_twist #alter_ego #homoerotic #breaking_the_fourth_wall #dissociative_identity_disorder


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Fight Club 1999 123movies 1 Fight Club 1999 123movies 28.8/10 Votes: 1,863,523
Fight Club 1999 123movies 3 Fight Club 1999 123movies 279%
Fight Club 1999 123movies 5 Fight Club 1999 123movies 266/100
Fight Club 1999 123movies 7 Fight Club 1999 123movies 28.4 Votes: 21370 Popularity: 50.971

Reviews:

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https://www.msbreviews.com

David Fincher’s new film, Mank, is coming soon on Netflix, released six years after his latest installment, Gone Girl. Therefore, this week I’m reviewing five of Fincher’s movies. Se7en was the first one, and now it’s time for one of the most culturally impactful films of the 90s, Fight Club. This is another rewatch of another filmmaking classic, one that I was never able to absolutely adore like most people. When this movie came out in 1999, critics were extremely divided, and the film failed at the box office. With time, it gained a cult following through home media, but it’s still considered a very controversial piece of cinema. So, nothing new, having in mind Fincher is at the helm.

Despite this being my third or fourth time experiencing this story, I never really changed my opinion about it, which is a bit uncommon in my viewing history. Usually, after multiple rewatches, my overall thoughts about a movie slightly vary, but Fight Club is one of the few exceptions. I believe my opinion remains intact from the very first watch. I really enjoy this film, but I can’t state that I absolutely love it. Since this is a special case, I’m going to start with what still bothers me after so many viewings, something I also rarely do in my reviews since I always leave the bad stuff to the end of the article.

Without spoiling anything, of course, there’s a vital plot twist that comes later in the movie that I could only appreciate by its execution, but never by its impact on the narrative. Jim Uhls’ screenplay relies on the main characters’ friendship to carry the story forward, and throughout the first two acts, Fincher leaves not-that-subtle hints to a massive revelation, which eventually triggers the beginning of the third act. This major plot point is brilliantly executed, and I still feel incredibly fascinated by its delivery, both in terms of the dialogue and the performances. However, its impact on any lightly focused, observant viewer is close to zero due to the clear evidence that pointed towards this development.

Now, I don’t want to sound like that stereotypical moviegoer that says, “I guessed the twist before its revelation, hence it all sucks”. Like I insinuate above, I was still wholly captivated during the entirety of the third act. Nevertheless, Fight Club’s runtime is far from being short, and Fincher spends a lot of time building up an idea that loses its surprise factor even before the film’s midpoint. It changes the protagonist’s perspective, it takes the viewer through a predictable yet entertaining path, setting up a powerful, meaningful ending. However, personally, I don’t feel like the time spent in the first two acts was satisfyingly compensated in the end… at least, not in its entirety.

The second act also has a short period where it loses a bit of steam due to some repetitive sequences and an unnecessary amount of flashbacks. Again, I feel like Fincher didn’t completely trust the audience back then, contrary to his procedure in Se7en. In the latter flick, Fincher left the biggest responsibility to the viewer’s imagination, leaving the murder scenes for the audience to picture in their minds. In Fight Club, that ambiguity and implicit dialogue are still present, sure, but even before the third act, there’s already an attempt to explain too much certain portions of the narrative that I wish would stay vaguer.

Without spoiling anything, of course, there’s a vital plot twist that comes later in the movie that I could only appreciate by its execution, but never by its impact on the narrative. Jim Uhls’ screenplay relies on the main characters’ friendship to carry the story forward, and throughout the first two acts, Fincher leaves not-that-subtle hints to a massive revelation, which eventually triggers the beginning of the third act. This major plot point is brilliantly executed, and I still feel incredibly fascinated by its delivery, both in terms of the dialogue and the performances. However, its impact on any lightly focused, observant viewer is close to zero due to the clear evidence that pointed towards this development.

Now, I don’t want to sound like that stereotypical moviegoer that says, “I guessed the twist before its revelation, hence it all sucks”. Like I insinuate above, I was still wholly captivated during the entirety of the third act. Nevertheless, Fight Club’s runtime is far from being short, and Fincher spends a lot of time building up an idea that loses its surprise factor even before the film’s midpoint. It changes the protagonist’s perspective, it takes the viewer through a predictable yet entertaining path, setting up a powerful, meaningful ending. However, personally, I don’t feel like the time spent in the first two acts was satisfyingly compensated in the end… at least, not in its entirety.

The second act also has a short period where it loses a bit of steam due to some repetitive sequences and an unnecessary amount of flashbacks. Again, I feel like Fincher didn’t completely trust the audience back then, contrary to his procedure in Se7en. In the latter flick, Fincher left the biggest responsibility to the viewer’s imagination, leaving the murder scenes for the audience to picture in their minds. In Fight Club, that ambiguity and implicit dialogue are still present, sure, but even before the third act, there’s already an attempt to explain too much certain portions of the narrative that I wish would stay vaguer.

Don’t worry, I’m done with the negatives, and don’t forget: I really, really like this movie. Obviously, Fincher and Uhls created a story packed with underlying themes and social commentary. From the whole consumerism theory to the more psychological component regarding Edward Norton’s mental state, every message is seamlessly communicated to the audience. I’ve also been through a point in my life where I wish I’d be someone else, someone who had already achieved every dream of mine successfully with an overwhelming feeling of fulfillment. Coping with the inability to become that perfect someone can become an excruciating, sad, depressing process, and it varies drastically from person to person.

Fight Club approaches mental health and people’s acceptance of who they truly are in a groundbreaking manner, capturing Edward Norton’s emotions perfectly and broadcasting his thoughts through some of the best narration in the history of cinema. Its take on the world of consumerism is undoubtedly interesting and plays a big part in the climax of the film. Despite the issues described above, Uhls’ screenplay is very well-written, elevating the conversations between Norton and Brad Pitt (Ad Astra, Once Upon a Time in Hollywood), which are indeed remarkably entertaining. Predictable or not, the main story is wonderfully executed by Fincher, who continues to demonstrate his impressive technical attributes.

Once again, the pre-production phase is proved here to be as important as any other stage in the filmmaking process. Fincher’s dedication to his features is palpable and visible on-screen through every single technical aspect. This time, Fincher brought in Jeff Cronenweth as the director of photography, and both worked together to not only create that desaturated, realistic atmosphere that Fincher loves so much but also to deliver the brutal, violent, bloody fight scenes that keep the entertainment levels at their highest. With clean, consistent, coherent editing from James Haygood, the movie flows beautifully despite its lengthy runtime. The Dust Brothers’ score is quite alternative, which suits the also unconventional storytelling.

Last but not least, Edward Norton and Brad Pitt. I know it’s incredibly cliche to write that two actors share impeccable chemistry, but Norton and Pitt take it to a whole other level. In two physically-demanding displays, both actors deliver award-worthy performances that marked their careers. Pitt offers one of his most underrated portrayals, being extremely funny throughout the entire film, but also astonishingly badass, carrying his fight sequences as amazing as he does with his dialogues. On the other hand, seeing Norton go all-out is a terrific experience. I lack words to describe such an emotionally compelling interpretation, filled with powerful character moments. A final word of praise to Helena Bonham Carter (Enola Holmes), who also delivers an exceptional performance.

In the end, Fight Club is and will probably remain David Fincher’s most controversial movie for a long, long time. With an absolutely brilliant direction and execution, Fincher uses Jim Uhls’ captivating, layered, unconventional screenplay to tackle themes such as consumerism, society’s behavior, and mental health, seamlessly transmitting meaningful yet contentious messages. Once again, the filmmaking in display is technically flawless, going from the trademark authentic cinematography and production design to the unique score, all flowing superbly through excellent editing. Unfortunately, I don’t belong to the group of people who utterly love this film. The excessive (sometimes unnecessary) use of flashbacks doesn’t help, but it’s the enormous build-up packed with overly explicit clues to a significant (yet unsurprising) plot twist that ends up partially ruining the viewing for me. I also wish that the script developed a few plot points more ambiguously, but Brad Pitt and Edward Norton elevate the whole movie so much with their ridiculously outstanding performances that these small issues don’t keep me away from highly recommending one of the most memorable, iconic films of all-time.

Rating: A-

Review By: msbreviews Rating: 8 Date: 2020-11-22
Pretty awesome movie. It shows what one crazy person can convince other crazy people to do. Everyone needs something to believe in. I recommend Jesus Christ, but they want Tyler Durden.
Review By: Goddard Rating: Date: 2018-06-09
This is a very important movie.
When I first saw the previews for this movie, it had me interested. A movie about guys who fight – it didn’t seem to deep, but I thought it would provide entertainment. I had heard buzz about, a few of my friends raved about it for a few days, and I was convinced. I should see this movie. I went to my local video store and picked up the last remaining DVD. I popped it in, sat in amazement until the last credit rolled, and then watched it again. And again. And again.

This movie is dark and disturbing, however, it is equally smart and stylistic. I found it hard to watch at points, but I couldn’t turn my eyes away. Fight Club makes many bold statements against the modern consumer-driven society, and produces Norton’s best performance and Pitt’s second best (12 Monkeys).

Norton plays an average-Joe who is living a dead-end life. He needs something to change his life. Tyler and Marla will take care of this, and that is all I want to give away. Other comments will tell you more, but I suggest you let it all sink in while watching. As for it’s ending, it doesn’t rival ‘The Sixth Sense’ – it blows it away. One of the best movie endings I’ve seen. Even better if you’re a Pixies fan.

As for it being important, don’t worry. You will be hearing about this movie. When ‘A Clockwork Orange’ came out, it was met with mixed reviews, deemed too dark and violent, and is now considered a classic. These two movies share quite a bit in common – both were based on great books. If you haven’t read either, get to it. Politicians will use this movie as a demonstration of careless and consequenceless violence in movies, and as a perfect example of what today’s youth are being influenced by.

Watch this movie, and watch it again with some of your more intelligent friends. 10 out of 10.

Review By: The_Retard_Whisperer Rating: Date: 2001-03-20
Great Film: Deserved Several Academy Award Nominations
The script was tight, the theme fascinating, the acting incredible (especially Edward Norton, as one might expect), the direction inspired, and the cinematography stunning. It is one of the few films of the past five years that deserves to be seen multiple times. In fact, if you have seen it only once, you have missed something. I was seriously hoping the movie would receive Oscar nominations for Best Actor (Norton), Best Screenplay, Best Director, Best Cinematography and Best Picture.

So, how is it that the film received no nominations? Unfortunately, it had a mismatched ad campaign. The ads made it seem like the movie was about street boxing, instead of a intellectual and emotional ride through a man’s psyche as he takes a strange path toward rebellion against consumer society. As a result, most who went to see it were disappointed, and those who would recognize its brilliance stayed far away from the movie theaters. This is one of the most underrated movies I know.

I always love movies that keep you entertained and keep you guessing, and this movie scores a 10 in both. Those who enjoyed The Game, Memento, or The Matrix really should check it out.

Review By: robertharkins Rating: 10 Date: 2001-09-24

Other Information:

Original Title Fight Club
Release Date 1999-10-15
Release Year 1999

Original Language en
Runtime 2 hr 19 min (139 min), 2 hr 31 min (151 min) (workprint)
Budget 63000000
Revenue 100853753
Status Released
Rated R
Genre Drama
Director David Fincher
Writer Chuck Palahniuk (novel), Jim Uhls (screenplay)
Actors Edward Norton, Brad Pitt, Meat Loaf, Zach Grenier
Country Germany, USA
Awards Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 11 wins & 37 nominations.
Production Company Art Linson Productions, Fox 2000 Pictures, Taurus Film, New Regency Pictures
Website N/A


Technical Information:

Sound Mix Dolby Digital, DTS, SDDS
Aspect Ratio 2.39 : 1
Camera Panavision Panaflex Platinum, Panavision Primo Lenses
Laboratory Technicolor, Hollywood (CA), USA
Film Length 3,813 m (Sweden)
Negative Format 35 mm (Kodak Vision 250D 5246, Eastman EXR 100T 5248, Vision 500T 5279)
Cinematographic Process Super 35 (Fincher-third)
Printed Film Format 35 mm (anamorphic) (Kodak Vision 2383)

Fight Club 1999 123movies
Fight Club 1999 123movies
Fight Club 1999 123movies
Fight Club 1999 123movies
Fight Club 1999 123movies
Fight Club 1999 123movies
Fight Club 1999 123movies
Fight Club 1999 123movies
Fight Club 1999 123movies
Fight Club 1999 123movies
Original title Fight Club
TMDb Rating 8.4 21,370 votes

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